Tuesday, November 5, 2019
02:45 PM to 04:00 PM
Location: Amsterdam RAI
  • Chair - André Struker, Waternet
  • Chair - Pam Elardo, NYCDEP
Session: Creating value out of wastewater

Theme: Energy transition and resource recovery
Organiser: NYC DEP and Waternet
Other organisations: PUB,

 

1. Speaker Pamela Elardo, Deputy Commissioner of the Bureau of Wastewater Treatment – NYCDEP New York

Topic NYC DEP:  Recovering value from co-digestion of source separated organics

In order to achieve New York City’s ambitious targets of energy-neutral wastewater treatment operations and carbon neutrality by 2050, NYC DEP must beneficially use all of its anaerobic digester gas while significantly increasing the production of this green resource. Food waste co-digestion supports not only the initiative to boost biogas production and quality but also advances the city’s goal to minimize the landfilling of compostable and digestible organic materials and instead recover those valuable resources for beneficial use.

Since 2016, NYC DEP has engaged in a full-scale demonstration of co-digestion of source-separated organics (SSOs)—including food waste from residences, schools, and commercial establishments—that has attained landfill diversion rates as high as 140 tons of food waste per day. The food waste SSO is decontaminated and pre-slurried off-site, then it is brought to NYC DEP’s Newtown Creek Wastewater Resource Recovery Facility for co-digestion with wastewater sludge. Results are encouraging, we are seeing an increase in biogas production without negative impacts on digester performance. Next steps at Newtown Creek is to take steps to increase SSO receiving capacity to up to 500 tons per day.

Meeting these levels of diversion will not be without its challenges. The financial and operational costs of co-digestion must be considered alongside the urgent needs to upgrade and maintain a service levels of aging infrastructure, as well as to mitigate the worst effects of climate change. NYC DEP is seeking additional opportunities to co-digest food waste at other WRRFs, to advocate for policies and systems that will encourage these efforts, and to support the creation of a strong market for food waste in compliance with the city’s various climate change mitigation goals and legislation.

2. Speaker Ooi Kian Eng – Director Water Reclamation Plant, PUB

Topic PUB: Resource Recovery – Circular Economy

Singapore has successfully adopted the circular economy approach in its water management by closing the water loop and turning used water into NEWater, Singapore’s own brand of ultra-clean reclaimed water.   NEWater is used mainly by the industries and today, it meets about 40% of Singapore’s total water needs.  This is expected to grow to 55% in the future.

PUB, Singapore’s national water agency, is now developing a new 176mgd water reclamation plant at the western end of Singapore, Tuas Water Reclamation Plant (TWRP).  It will be co-located with an Integrated Waste Management Facility (IWMF) developed by Singapore’s National Environment Agency (NEA) at the same time.  Dubbed the Tuas Nexus, the integrated solid waste and used water treatment complex aims to grow the circular economy by harnessing innovative synergies between the two facilities, such that the by-product of one facility becomes a resource for the other facility.   For example, the IWMF will supply TWRP with electricity generated from the incineration of solid waste, while TWRP will supply IWMF with treated water and gas for its operations.

Singapore has designated 2019 as the Year towards Zero Waste.  To this end, PUB plans to expand the circular economy further to include resource recovery from our used water and sludge, which is not widely done currently.  There is potential to recover Nitrogen (N) and Phosphorus (P) for instance, for use as fertilizers in urban farming, an industry which Singapore has planned to develop in a big way.   PUB is also looking to convert used water sludge into useful materials such as bio-char or construction aggregates.  If successful, the amount of incineration ash to be disposed at landfill sites will be significantly reduced.  PUB is in the early stages of developing a resource recovery plan, and there is much we hope to learn from the world.

3. Speaker Denis Penouel, Deputy Director General, SIAAP

Topic SIAAP: Consequences of the circular economy in the field of sanitation

As many sanitation utilities in the World, the SIAAP, the public utility for the sanitation of the Greater Paris, in charge of the treatment of the sewage of 9 million inhabitants, is now considering urban wastewater as a resource. The link between water, energy and agricultural production is at the top of the agenda at all major sanitation utilities.

To meet the environmental challenges – climate change mitigation and natural resources scarcity, – new stakes are arising. Energy recovery from sanitation is an illustration of these new challenges. This brings to develop new skills in the field economy and trade with by-product with a high economical value. Another stake is related to new skills and new jobs around energy which lead to questions around developing internal competences or using contractors. This also requires to establish new relationships to develop partnership with new players such as operators of heat network or to cooperate with other utilities to develop new resources synergies to increase energy production.

Through examples, the SIAAP will illustrates the developments that are ongoing in this field. These examples will be around heat recovery from sewage and increasing biogas production with fermentable matter from solid wastes.

The questions settled by SIAAP are:

  • In circular economy, there is the word economy. This is not only mass balance. It is also business cases financial resources. This mainly because circular economy brings us out of our core field of action, the exploitation of these resources requires investments, and because these resources have an economical value, it makes sense to think in terms of economy and return on investments.
  • Resource recovery requires new skills. Shall we develop internal competences or outsourcing.

4. Speaker Ben de Ru, Program director Themal Energy, waste water, Waternet

Topic Waternet: Resource recovery and sludge treatment

Energy and resource recovery are important topics in the Netherlands. The national goals for circular economy are 50% waste reduction in 2030 and zero waste in 2050. Recovering struvite, calcite, cellulose and biomass together with partners are inspiring examples of achieving these goals.

The climate ambition is 49% CO2-emssion reduction in 2030 relative to 1990. Waternet has an energy saving program, which is to become climate neutral and has also been asked by the city of Amsterdam to realize thermal energy projects to heat and cool buildings.

Additionally, sludge treatment is becoming a significant issue in the Netherlands. Therefore, sustainable sludge treatment techniques are needed. We are currently posing the questions of what is needed for the agricultural sector to use sludge as a fertilizer? And what are the governance aspects a water utility in the Netherlands has to deal with for recovering sludge?

 


Energy transition and resource recovery
Workshop
Cities

Location: Amsterdam RAI
Room: E102

Add to Agenda 05 November 2019 14:45 05 November 2019 16:00 Europe/Amsterdam Creating value out of wastewater

Theme: Energy transition and resource recovery
Organiser: NYC DEP and Waternet
Other organisations: PUB,

 

1. Speaker Pamela Elardo, Deputy Commissioner of the Bureau of Wastewater Treatment – NYCDEP New York

Topic NYC DEP:  Recovering value from co-digestion of source separated organics

In order to achieve New York City’s ambitious targets of energy-neutral wastewater treatment operations and carbon neutrality by 2050, NYC DEP must beneficially use all of its anaerobic digester gas while significantly increasing the production of this green resource. Food waste co-digestion supports not only the initiative to boost biogas production and quality but also advances the city’s goal to minimize the landfilling of compostable and digestible organic materials and instead recover those valuable resources for beneficial use.

Since 2016, NYC DEP has engaged in a full-scale demonstration of co-digestion of source-separated organics (SSOs)—including food waste from residences, schools, and commercial establishments—that has attained landfill diversion rates as high as 140 tons of food waste per day. The food waste SSO is decontaminated and pre-slurried off-site, then it is brought to NYC DEP’s Newtown Creek Wastewater Resource Recovery Facility for co-digestion with wastewater sludge. Results are encouraging, we are seeing an increase in biogas production without negative impacts on digester performance. Next steps at Newtown Creek is to take steps to increase SSO receiving capacity to up to 500 tons per day.

Meeting these levels of diversion will not be without its challenges. The financial and operational costs of co-digestion must be considered alongside the urgent needs to upgrade and maintain a service levels of aging infrastructure, as well as to mitigate the worst effects of climate change. NYC DEP is seeking additional opportunities to co-digest food waste at other WRRFs, to advocate for policies and systems that will encourage these efforts, and to support the creation of a strong market for food waste in compliance with the city’s various climate change mitigation goals and legislation.

2. Speaker Ooi Kian Eng – Director Water Reclamation Plant, PUB

Topic PUB: Resource Recovery – Circular Economy

Singapore has successfully adopted the circular economy approach in its water management by closing the water loop and turning used water into NEWater, Singapore’s own brand of ultra-clean reclaimed water.   NEWater is used mainly by the industries and today, it meets about 40% of Singapore’s total water needs.  This is expected to grow to 55% in the future.

PUB, Singapore’s national water agency, is now developing a new 176mgd water reclamation plant at the western end of Singapore, Tuas Water Reclamation Plant (TWRP).  It will be co-located with an Integrated Waste Management Facility (IWMF) developed by Singapore’s National Environment Agency (NEA) at the same time.  Dubbed the Tuas Nexus, the integrated solid waste and used water treatment complex aims to grow the circular economy by harnessing innovative synergies between the two facilities, such that the by-product of one facility becomes a resource for the other facility.   For example, the IWMF will supply TWRP with electricity generated from the incineration of solid waste, while TWRP will supply IWMF with treated water and gas for its operations.

Singapore has designated 2019 as the Year towards Zero Waste.  To this end, PUB plans to expand the circular economy further to include resource recovery from our used water and sludge, which is not widely done currently.  There is potential to recover Nitrogen (N) and Phosphorus (P) for instance, for use as fertilizers in urban farming, an industry which Singapore has planned to develop in a big way.   PUB is also looking to convert used water sludge into useful materials such as bio-char or construction aggregates.  If successful, the amount of incineration ash to be disposed at landfill sites will be significantly reduced.  PUB is in the early stages of developing a resource recovery plan, and there is much we hope to learn from the world.

3. Speaker Denis Penouel, Deputy Director General, SIAAP

Topic SIAAP: Consequences of the circular economy in the field of sanitation

As many sanitation utilities in the World, the SIAAP, the public utility for the sanitation of the Greater Paris, in charge of the treatment of the sewage of 9 million inhabitants, is now considering urban wastewater as a resource. The link between water, energy and agricultural production is at the top of the agenda at all major sanitation utilities.

To meet the environmental challenges – climate change mitigation and natural resources scarcity, – new stakes are arising. Energy recovery from sanitation is an illustration of these new challenges. This brings to develop new skills in the field economy and trade with by-product with a high economical value. Another stake is related to new skills and new jobs around energy which lead to questions around developing internal competences or using contractors. This also requires to establish new relationships to develop partnership with new players such as operators of heat network or to cooperate with other utilities to develop new resources synergies to increase energy production.

Through examples, the SIAAP will illustrates the developments that are ongoing in this field. These examples will be around heat recovery from sewage and increasing biogas production with fermentable matter from solid wastes.

The questions settled by SIAAP are:

  • In circular economy, there is the word economy. This is not only mass balance. It is also business cases financial resources. This mainly because circular economy brings us out of our core field of action, the exploitation of these resources requires investments, and because these resources have an economical value, it makes sense to think in terms of economy and return on investments.
  • Resource recovery requires new skills. Shall we develop internal competences or outsourcing.

4. Speaker Ben de Ru, Program director Themal Energy, waste water, Waternet

Topic Waternet: Resource recovery and sludge treatment

Energy and resource recovery are important topics in the Netherlands. The national goals for circular economy are 50% waste reduction in 2030 and zero waste in 2050. Recovering struvite, calcite, cellulose and biomass together with partners are inspiring examples of achieving these goals.

The climate ambition is 49% CO2-emssion reduction in 2030 relative to 1990. Waternet has an energy saving program, which is to become climate neutral and has also been asked by the city of Amsterdam to realize thermal energy projects to heat and cool buildings.

Additionally, sludge treatment is becoming a significant issue in the Netherlands. Therefore, sustainable sludge treatment techniques are needed. We are currently posing the questions of what is needed for the agricultural sector to use sludge as a fertilizer? And what are the governance aspects a water utility in the Netherlands has to deal with for recovering sludge?

 

E102 - Amsterdam RAI